The Critical Thinker

My name is Kristan T. Harris. I have run for political office and have worked a political grass roots campaign for Ron Paul. I was nominated and elected to the GOP platform committee in 2012. I am a huge advocate for liberty and freedom.I am a libertarian at heart. I am also a news junkie and love a good mystery.

U.S. Intelligence Chief James Clapper: We Could Use Your Fridge to Spy on You

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Does the Government Still Need a Search Warrant to Digitally Enter Your Home?

Kristan T. Harris | The Rundown Live

United States Intelligence Chief James Clapper has come out and said the government can now use your refrigerator to spy on you, according to a report presented to the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

“In the future, intelligence services might use the [Internet of Things] for identification, surveillance, monitoring, location tracking, and targeting for recruitment, or to gain access to networks or user credentials,” Clapper said.

New refrigerators that connect to the internet are now entering homes with cameras installed in them that can be used to surveil you.

In post 9/11 America, we have learned that government surveillance systems have gone to the absolute extremes to collect metadata on residents, even compiling citizen rankings.

Soon all things will be connected through the internet, creating smart homes that are equipped with smart meters which relay information to smart grids to create a smart city.

One thing we can learn from history is that the Internet is seldom if ever a secure environment. Hackers, trolls, political enemies, and even government employees have proven it can be easily breached and abused to expose, and sometimes even blackmail, individuals.

“Devices, designed and fielded with minimal security requirements and testing, and an ever-increasing complexity of networks could lead to widespread vulnerabilities in civilian infrastructures and U.S. government systems,” Clapper said. “These developments will pose challenges to our cyber defenses and operational tradecraft but also create new opportunities for our own intelligence collectors.”

 

 


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